Double Igloo

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keenecamper
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Double Igloo

Post by keenecamper » Sun Nov 02, 2008 8:10 pm

Hello all I am new here. I am goin to purchase the ICEBOX igloo maker soon in hopes to hike Mt. Monadnock and camp overnight.

I was wondering if something was possible. I was wondering if you can build 2 igloos side by side, touching, and dig a door between the 2 igloos in order to make a double igloo.

Is this possible?

I am interested in experimenting with this idea.

Hope to hear your thoughts and feedback.

Good Day

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Igloo Ed
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Re: Double Igloo

Post by Igloo Ed » Mon Nov 03, 2008 11:20 am

keenecamper wrote:I was wondering if you can build 2 igloos side by side, touching, and dig a door between the 2 igloos in order to make a double igloo.

Is this possible?
Welcome to the forum Keenecamper.
I've built joining igloos twice and it works but...
The problem is the door, you only want one door because two doors create a cross draft and the igloos will be cold.
If the door is dug in at the joining point of the two igloos, the head clearance when going in and out of the igloo will be limited.
A resonable solution is to have the door on one of the igloos and dig the trench across that igloo and into the second igloo. This would mean that some of the floor space of the igloos would be lost. I normally cook where the trench through the first igloo would be.
In order to build joining igloos, build the first igloo and then position the stake of the second igloo close enough that the two igloos overlap. After the second igloo is built the wall between the two igloos can be removed. When I did this, the resulting curve looked to be a catenary. However, I never came back to those igloos and I don't know if they sagged as a result.
It takes some creativity to build the second igloo. The lower layers on the second igloo are built by butting the open end of the form against the first igloo and then, as you come around and run into the igloo again, the pole needs to be released by disengaging the spring clips in the pole so it can be shorten significantly. The form is then lifted strait up and off the wall. This leaves a big gap between the layer being built and the first igloo that needs to be formed and packed by hand.
Eventually the layers get high enough that the layers no longer intersect the first igloo. At that point a ramp needs to be built so it exists for the top layers.
Another method would be to build two igloos side by side and pack snow between them and then dig a tunnel from one to the other.
Also, if the trench is not dug into the second igloo and the second igloo is considered a bed room, people could crawl across the beds in the second igloo when going to bed.

Hiatus
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Re: Double Igloo

Post by Hiatus » Thu Nov 20, 2008 3:58 pm

This thread intrigued me. I did some calculations in Excel and sketches in AutoCAD and found the following.

First, the passage way between two overlapping igloos of the same size does form a catenary curve and the loads should be balanced both horizontally and vertically. This means the structure should withstand some abuse.

If you want to build a double igloo with a 3' passage height between them then follow Ed's instructions but place your stake the following distances from the wall of the first igloo:

For an igloo 8' in diameter place the stake 18" minus the wall thickness from the outside of the igloo. (I couldn't remember nor measure the wall thickness at this time.)

For an igloo 9' in diameter use 24" minus wall thickness.

For an igloo 10' in diameter use 21" minus wall thickness.

And for an igloo 11' in diameter use 29" minus wall thickness.

With these dimensions you will increase the floor space from 50.3sf to 90.5sf for an 8' igloo, from 63.6sf to 116.5sf for a 9' igloo, from 78.5sf to 140.8sf for a 10' igloo, and from 95sf to 173.8sf for an 11' igloo.

I figure you will move about 10% more snow per square foot of floor space with a double igloo vs two side by side igloos. This doesn't account for additional snow to build an atrium between two side-by-sides.

Why no numbers for a 7'? With it's low ceiling and flatter profile there is little area gain if one want's to maintain a 36" clearance in the passageway.

Regards,

Hiatus

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Igloo Ed
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Re: Double Igloo

Post by Igloo Ed » Wed Nov 26, 2008 10:24 pm

Hiatus wrote:I couldn't remember nor measure the wall thickness at this time.
Hiatus
I've been hoping you'd post some day so I could welcome you to the forum. So, Welcome aboard Hiatus.
The wall thickness is 8 inches.
That's a lot of modeling to get those numbers, thank you very much.
We might get some members trying this and get some feed back. Myself, I don't have enough teammates to pull something like this off.

Dusty
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Re: Double Igloo (multiple overlapping igloo rings)

Post by Dusty » Wed May 11, 2011 12:40 am

This thread intrigued me as well. I think there is some serious potential in overlapping multiple igloos for those who want to put the work in. Why stop at two? What if a large group of people made a ring of overlapping igloos such that the first overlaps with the last? I used the numbers given by Hiatus (Thanks for figuring them out!) to draw out a few floor plan possibilities with Google SketchUp7 and I think they are pretty exciting (see pictures attached below). I only tried making rings using 11' igloos since I figured anyone ambitious enough to try this would want to go all out. It turns out that the minimum number of 11' igloos that can be overlapped in such a way that there are 36" high archways between them is 5, since any fewer produce such a tight circle that there are no walls left on the center side of the igloos and I imagine that the ring would difficult to build and unstable. A 5 igloo ring would only have a center column about 1.5' thick at the base to support the roof, but I imagine this would be sufficient to hold up the roof since every aspect of the ring structure would still be catenary curves. The resultant structure would be like one large igloo room with a central column holding up the roof. Quite epic in my opinion.

I also drew out what a ring of 6 11' igloos with 36" high archways between them would look like. This structure would have a much stronger, and potentially hollow, central column, since more of each igloo is intact. However, from the inside I imagine this would appear more as a curved series of connected individual igloos rather than one large room with a central column like the 5 igloo ring would.

To make the ring, you would first have to pack down the area for the entire structure. For the 6 igloo ring this would be a circle with a diameter of roughly 28'. The 5' would have need a diameter of about 24'. I imagine that flat ground would be a near necessity. These and subsequent measurements could be done accurately in the field with a long string attached to a stake placed in the center of the construction site that is free to rotate on the stake.

I have the measurements needed to make these igloo rings and the techniques I used to find them, but I have to be doing other things now (I have a three midterms tomorrow morning...), so I'll probably continue on this thread another time if anyone is interested and post the ideas I have for making such a structure in the field, using minimal and inexpensive measuring equipment (basically a string marked with the relevant measurements).

I want to try this eventually, although ill need a team of at least 6 experienced igloo-makers and preferably 2 iceboxes to make it happen in a reasonable amount of time. If anyone else tries it first, let me know! I would love to hear how it comes out.
6-igloo ring.png
The inside lines represent a possible trench layout.
5-igloo ring.png

Hiatus
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Re: Double Igloo

Post by Hiatus » Wed May 11, 2011 8:59 am

If double adjoining igloos become popular then Ed might have to invent an igloo bra to keep them from sagging! :lol:

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